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Posts Tagged ‘buckeye trees’

Regarding the yard areas, I fell in love with the feeling of seclusion, wildwood beauty, and bittersweet memories lingering in the air. The day lilies were like a promise that everything could be glorious…

Homestead West Yard, Orange Daylilies, Bushes, Weeds, Hot Looking - August 2009

…the moss that things could indeed grow – water! –

…the periwinkle that beauty was not just for part of the time.

Back Porch Steps, Farm House, Homestead - Belle Honeysuckle, Nightshade, Weeds - August 2009

The back porch spoke of long summer evenings, and attendance on flower boxes (one was collapsed in a heap at the south end).

…the butterflies, though only cabbage butterflies, that there were blooming plants, and no insecticides to interfere with the good forms of life (as well as the not-so-desirable).

In short, there were many things that gave me hope – of productiveness, fun, and loveliness.
The buckeye tree fascinated me –

 

 

I’d never seen one before. We learned that the nuts, if properly boiled and prepared, can be a useful arthritis remedy, and the kids had fun making necklaces out of cured nuts. The tree is not doing so very well now, so we are trying to get a few little trees started, in case it succumbs.

Also, discovering mushrooms and slime molds:

http://highplainsgardening.blogspot.com/2009/08/homestead-mushroom-paradise-including.html?zx=dc00c6c523a2986f

 

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You know that unkown nut tree on the property we hope to buy? It turns out it’s a buckeye. The nuts are maturing now, and they are beautiful.

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Will picked up some nuts, still in the husks, that had fallen from the tree, and days later, they split open on their own, revealing the pretty-as-jewelry nuts.

We found out the nuts are poisonous straight off the tree, and must be boiled or roasted to release their toxins, after which they can be used much like chestnuts.

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A-nutting we shall go…

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Better than a finger in the eye, ain’t they?

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Here is some more info on buckeye nuts and buckeye trees:

http://buckeyetree.net/

 

 

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Outbuilding Near House

Elm trees, and loads of catmint.

Branch by Garage

Moss, moss, everywhere…and lichens, too. That bit of weed bud hanging out in space is caught in the web of a barn spider…like Charlotte in Charlotte’s Web. They were expected – and welcome – residents.

Cistern

“Drunken berries” grow all over, including over the cistern and pump jack. I don’t know if there is a more scientific name for these berries, but Will grew up around them, and the birds who ate them crashed soon after. Hence, “drunken berries.” [Update: Summer 2013 – These are Belle Honeysuckle.] I am glad of the cedars, though…I like to use the berries in place of junipers, for cooking and herb use. They muscle test the same, or similar.

Side Gate, Cody

Moving to the south side of the house (the cistern is on the northeast), we have the broken side gate…and Billy with some lilies (we are looking into the front yard, on the east of the house).

Dining Room Windows Outside, Roses

Looking at the dining room windows, with their guarding Belle honeysuckle bushes.

Nut Tree south of House

A buckeye tree, beginning to fruit.

Periwinkle Vine Groundcover, Full Amongst Fallen Branches - August 2009

 

This vine/ground-cover appears to be periwinkle…I love it.

Moss on Porch, Junk

As I said, lots of moss. Can you imagine things sitting undisturbed this long as to allow this…in a part of the country that gets an average of 14″ of precipitation a year?

Flower Garden, Sunflowers

Another portion of the flower garden. I like sunflowers, and day lilies are quite nostalgic for me…my grandma had a large bed in her yard.

Pasture to South

Some nice forage grasses…it’s not all weeds and trees. This is the pasture to the south of the house. The last animals to graze it were sheep, a few years ago.

As you can see, this is just the beginning of finding out what grows here, and what we have to contend with. The man selling the property has told us this is one of the better years he has seen, as far as things looking lush, and having a great variety of things. I guess, usually, the prickly lettuce takes precedence. That shouldn’t be as much a problem as some other types of weeds, in the long run.

I expect I’ll find some fruit trees by and by, or perhaps some berry bushes of more useful types.

I noticed what appears to be a tangle of asparagus, near the gates.

And who knows what is hiding in the old garden area?

It’ll be fun finding out.

Will remembers hunting here 20 years ago, walking right through the yard after pheasants, not realizing the old lady still lived here. She never seemed to notice him, either.

Cozy. I think that’s one word for the place.

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